Lead Your Life

Leadership, Awareness, and Growth

Our Purpose Path February 20, 2018

**Article originally published by WNC Women February 2018**


I hesitate to say I’ve learned anything completely as mastery is elusive.  Time shifts understanding and advances possibility.  And thus, what I can say is I am on the path to learn a better way.  A better way to make an impact, live fully, care for myself, and love unabashedly.

In my life, I have overemphasized the importance of work.  I’m quite skilled at this imbalance and have prescribed to the “first in, last out” attendance policy, gone the extra mile(s) always, and sacrificed health and personal relationships as the price of progress.

It sounds horrid, I know.  However, it looks quite lovely.  I am happily married with two beautiful teenagers I adore and who for the most part, adore me.  I own two businesses currently of wildly different missions; a building materials manufacturing company and Pure Yoga in downtown Asheville.  In my career, I have worked in corporate consulting, sold and bought businesses, turned personal passions into entrepreneurial enterprises, and logged a lot of frequent flyer miles and hours.

I say all of this from a place of humility as the way in which I have blazed this path is pocked with scars from using more force than grace.  While I’ve studiously managed my calendar to ensure presence with my family, this lifestyle has cooled friendships, waylaid adventure, and demised wellness.

Is a better way possible?  Must it mean giving up something in order to create a new? How differently might the world look standing on top of the wheel versus running at full sprint on the wheel?  We each have these questions to answer.  For me, I am learning to soften, to lean into experience as a sister companion to achievement.

11 years ago, I had a significant health crisis.  The year was 2006.  I was in the middle of an acquisition, my children were 2 and 4, and I was slowly, blindly running out of fuel.  I was strategically limiting my sleep so as to advance my work and be present for my kids, and eventually, my body began to fail.  It’s sneaky way of calling a time-out, no doubt as my hair began to fall out, my speech shattered, and my muscles atrophied.  I ached from head to toe, and I would drive places not knowing how I got there.

How can this even be?  I’m a long distance runner, avid hiker, golfer, lover of life.  I’m optimistic, genuinely happy, and surrounded by love.  I eat well, moderated everything that should be moderated, and yet, there I was in a slow fade.

My doctor’s comment to me?  “Your lifestyle looks great on paper.  And yet, if you don’t make a change, I’ll meet you in the hospital within 6 weeks.”   For someone who had always been in control of self and result, this was a shocking prognosis.  If I hadn’t been so overwhelmingly exhausted, I might have been petrified.

This type of depletion does not happen overnight.  In fact, there had been signs carefully ignored for 2 years leading up to it; symptoms, test results, subtle nudges from family.  All indicators that I believed mind over matter could eradicate.  For goodness sake, I didn’t have time to be sick.  I had two children, a husband, a dog that kept running away, and a business to lead.

And so, I finally got serious about the true roots of wellness. Here’s a secret I learned: they are deeper than our society wants us to believe.  We are told to eat well and exercise (no doubt because these two factors have immediate impact on appearance).  We are not taught that mindfulness is nourishment for our soul & deep sleep for our bodies.  We are not taught that our breath is a gateway to radiance.

We are taught to balance the plates in the air & by all means, look good doing it. As an achievement junkie, I had mastered that skill set.  I believe this is a skill set many women master.  You, my dear reader friend, can most likely relate. Your story reads differently and yet it is the same with altered characters and settings.

The next several years were an exercise of healing.  My eternal love affair with yoga started with a single mat practice led by an uncertified teacher in a country club dining room.  I eventually made my way to a meditation cushion, and while this practice still requires strong “self-nudges,” I am grateful for the way it rehabilitates every day regardless of what’s happening in my life.  I stopped distance running, slept more, and began eating to nourish and nurture versus control my weight.  And yes, I took 2 weeks off from work.  And while that may not sound like much, for me, it was a feat as that’s as much time as I took following the birth of both of my children.  (Sigh.)

I discovered gratitude as a practice versus emotion, and I expanded my net of connection by opening my heart and investing my time with friends I cherish.

It took 3 years for my markers to return to “low normal;” a daily reminder to me that these sacred vessels we are given to explore our life are to be treated with care and intention.

Today, my life may not look that differently than it did prior to 2006.  I still own and lead my manufacturing company, I have created two yoga studios; selling the first when my family moved to Asheville last year, and investing my heart and passion into the second.  I have paused one of my passions turned entrepreneurial enterprises to support wholehearted living versus whole-minded working, and my children are now teenagers.  They are my wisdom holders; allowing me to see every day what it looks like to play in life, to relish in being, and to come back to the middle path.  They also gently remind me when work absorbs me; while simultaneously accepting me as I am.

I’m wired to work.  Work has always been a strange word to me with its reference to unwanted but mandatory effort.  For me, it has always felt like impact, and for that, I am happy.

In my career, I have talked to hundreds of people; mostly women, about their life’s path and struggle.  I hear universal threads that link us all.  A desire for connection, a deep wanting for joy and fulfillment, and a question around how we are called to live meaningfully.  To live a life that lives beyond our lifetime.

My answer?  Trust yourself.  Slow down and listen.  Move your body in ways that heal your body and spirit.  Receive food as self-care.  Know that you know.  Confide in your sister friends.  Pursue impact.  Meaningful work happens because we clarify our purpose path, we courageously eliminate distractions, and then we get busy bringing it to life.  That’s the better way.








Life is like poker February 6, 2018


Someone once described life to me as a card game.  There are seasons to simply pass by the game, seasons to find your fellow players & choose the game, to pick up the card deck and shuffle, to deal, and to play.  Truthfully, this analogy annoyed me more than illuminating life’s cyclical nature; however, years later I can see this natural rhythm happening all around me.  In my life & in yours.

And while I’d love a more poetic metaphor, the card game is quite accurate.  The real learning is in our discernment on timing.  Are we tuned into our heart and inner wisdom deeply and clearly enough to recognize the season?  To notice when the season begins to shift?  Do we have the courage and grace to follow the shift?

If I take a moment in stillness and know what I know beyond my cognition, I can recognize the signs of the season.  I can spot the tiny changes that lead to the end of one and the entry of another.  Much like the buds on a tree signaling spring, I can sense within what is emerging.

The difference between natural transitions and human transitions is we can opt out.  The budding tree doesn’t halt spring’s arrival because you didn’t notice it, and the first cold wind doesn’t head back north taking winter with it just because you resisted its arrival.

A deck of cards; however, does not deal itself.  It does not send the invitation to the game.  It just waits until you engage.  And if our standard mode of operation is full steam ahead, we may not even notice its existence let alone its question.

The question it asks us is: Where am I called to be now?  What does fulfillment look like now?  What chapter of my life am I truly in and what is my impact throughout it?  And from that place of awareness,  courageous choice and graceful action.

Our world will tell you: play the game, play the game, play the game.  And as a lover of playing the game, I take the bait every time.  And, sometimes that’s aligned.  And sometimes not.  If our choice was cued from external guidance, misalignment is inevitable.

So turn within…  What season are you in?


Corpse Pose January 29, 2018

It’s the end of your yoga practice, and the teacher turns down the lights.  You know it’s coming…. savasana.  Deep rest.  No more sweating, twisting, or balancing.

Savasana translates to corpse pose.  Don’t let that make you feel any less affectionate about it!  The name reminds us that this pose is more than just resting.  It means to die to our little self (ego) so that our big Self (spirit) can soar.

In practical every day life, that might mean you invite your stories, fears, and limiting beliefs to pass away.  Your story of not enough time, your fear of failure, and your self chatter of “I’m not good enough.”

It might mean that we allow our roles and responsibilities to cease so that we know ourselves beyond our roles.  We connect with the essence of who we are, our divine state, first and foremost with a secondary interest in our responsibilities.  We value ourselves on our heart versus our achievements.  We love ourselves deeply as we are in our being versus our doing.

And it might mean that we simply let our thoughts die.  That at the end of our practice after we’ve worked out our bodies, minds, and energy, that we simply abide in stillness without effort.

For me, my body often appears to be in savasana but the rest of me is raring to go.  My mind is fired, my attention alert, my roles intact.  When this happens, can we let our judgement of self die?  Simply let what is be as it is.  Breathe it out.  Witness.  Accept.  Try anew.


What does that word even mean? January 9, 2018


My favorite definition of reverence comes from Gary Zukav who defines it as this:

“Reverence is engaging in a form and a depth of contact with Life that is well beyond the shell of hte form and into the essence.  Reverence is contact with the essence of each thing, person, plan, bird, and animal.  It is contact with the interior of its beingness.  

Reverence is an attitude of honoring Life.  It is simply the experience of accepting that all Life is of value; in and of itself.”

I’m toying with this idea of seeing beyond sight to the interior of life:   To the interior of myself, to the interior of you, to the interior of relationships, to the interior of experience.  To dwell in connection with the essence versus form.  To experience by feeling versus thinking.

When we roll out our mat, we stand before a great opportunity to draw in the interior.  To move beyond habit and lean in towards the richness of reverence.

The rubber on the reverence road is engaging in the essence of what haunts or challenges us.  Maybe the “form” of that is a person or situation (and within both a belief we hold).  And if the only life we can course select is our own, then what does reverence look like in these sticky spots?

For me, I believe that our individual creation alone speaks to our divinity at the seat of our being.  Whether our life’s actions mirror that divinity is our choice; however, I live with the belief that within everyone, regardless of noise, abides divinity as essence.  And so, can I see it when the conversation is twisted?  Can I see it when I feel mistreated or underappreciated?  Can I dwell in the interior of a person versus poking at their exterior with my frustrated thoughts?

I roll out my mat for many reasons.  And this is one.  To learn to choose better in every moment so that more moments are spent in reverence.


Why do we roll? January 2, 2018

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starts here

Roll out our mat, that is.

What brings us to yoga is often not what draws us back.  We come wanting, striving, reaching for wellness, inner peace, and connection.  We come back to receive its gifts in a knowing that it is not about “doing yoga” but about allowing yoga to envelope us.  And instead of thinking we are “changed;” meaning we’ve altered our state, perhaps we can consider that we are awakened to our true and natural state.

Always there; waiting for us to notice.

A gift of our practice is harmony.  We practice over and over, and then one day sometime between our opening om and our closing savasana, we wake up to the simple wisdom that we are so much bigger than our mind.  That our intelligence bursts beyond the limits of our cognitive thinking.

Our mind – that beautiful cranium that resides in our upper quarter – was divinely designed as a tool.  And with any tool, we use appropriately and with purpose.  We use a hammer when a hammer is needed, a wrench when a wrench is needed, and we keep the whole tool kit tucked away when we have no need at all.  (And given that we have upwards of 70,000 thoughts a day; most of which are repetitive, unconscious, and not helpful, I might argue that we don’t need it as often as we assume).

Our mind enables us to use discernment, solve problems, map out, and progress forward.  Without it, we would struggle to exit bed let alone have a meaningful impact.  However, much like the hammer, it is not always the only and/or most meaningful source of intelligence to apply.

Within us we carry divine intelligence, innate wisdom, heart knowing, and body brilliance.  All guides and as powerful as our mind.

So we roll out our  mat, and we signal to the brain:  Relax. Trust. Play well with others.  I am grateful to you, and I am not enslaved to you.  And while our intelligence habit is one of mind dominance, we come to our mat to access our full knowing, our total Self.



What is your funny bone anyway? November 14, 2017

My grandmother used to always say “that tickles my funny bone.”  And she had a carefree, easy laughter that sang joy in her space.  And while her life certainly challenges her at times, her attitude and perspective were steadily, if not resolutely,  positive.

She feels deeply across the spectrum of emotions, and she taught me to allow others to see you fully.  She’s not a hider, and yet, her most common state of being is joy.  Even in the midst of a busy life, the early death of her spouse, and the mental illness of a child.

Sometimes we laugh spontaneously; overcome with pleasure.  We find ourselves immersed in the sweetness of life’s nectar bemused, bright, and grateful.

And sometimes laughter is stifled by challenge and joy requires a deep dive into our heart.  These are the moments that matter the most; when levity & light aren’t the natural byproduct of a circumstance.

In these moments, we choose.  We choose the connector AND versus BUT as in “I am feeling deeply sad AND blessed.”  In these moments, we decide to “be fully in” our life while not allowing a circumstance to override our spirit.

Most of the time we live somewhere in the middle.  Our lives busy with routines and activities, we risk falling asleep at the wheel of our life.  Missing the sparkle or the opportunity to just giggle a little and for no reason.

When we decide to cultivate joy in the tiniest of ways, we can trust that those tiniest moments added together turn into a powerful pattern of joyful living.  As my dear friend Linzi would say:  “Leave a sparkle trail of happiness to illuminate the way for others.”


I’m not stressed…. November 2, 2017

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Stress is a creeper in our lives.  We are so busy “doing” that we don’t notice all of that “getting it done” is coming from a place of fight or flight.  When (if) we stop, we finally notice that we are worn out, exhausted, sleeping poorly, and anxious.

So what to do?  We feel more stressed trying to solve stress because we know what to do, and with best intentions, most of us aren’t doing it.  No bubble baths, daily meditation, counting our breath.  No funny movies to replace the news (facebook), no earlier bed time, and no daily yoga.  So, we keep “doing”, busily checking off the to-do’s on our list all the while giving ourselves a failing grade (judgement) on our self-care habits.

Sounds like a fabulous way to treat the person with whom we have our most intimate relationship, huh?

I’m an advocate for all the “things” we can do to reduce stress with a particular affinity for breath work and a physical yoga practice.  These are miracle workers in my life, and there is something even simpler that requires no extra time or special outfit.

The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to
choose one thought over another.
-William James

Where we place our attention expands.  For most of us lowly curious-about but not yet enlightened souls, our thoughts bubble up without us noticing.  This idea of choosing our thoughts seems almost laughable as our thoughts are grooved deeply into our subconsciousness and then, via bullet train, blast through to our consciousness.

What we can do is observe the thoughts upon arrival at the station, and then decide which to leave on the train, which to reshape, and which to embrace.  Sometimes the thought is deeply seeded, negative and easily refutable.

Think the “big story” in your life: I’m not good enough, I’m not smart, I’m too fat…..  These stories require intentional abandonment moment by moment and replacement with soul speak.  I am enough exactly as I am, I love myself as I am.”  Thich Nhat Hanh teaches to say “Dear One, I am here for you.”

Sometimes the thought is about the daily happenings, our perceptions of others, or our ruminations on the past and future.  Think “I can’t believe he said that, and she thinks I’m….”

I practice reframing these thoughts into questions.  How true is that?  What am I making that mean?  How can I contribute to something better in this situation?

There is one tool that can be used in almost all situations:  gratitude.  When your mind is swimming, just begin speaking aloud your blessings.  There’s something powerful about hearing your voice say thank you over and over that quiets the mind, expands the heart, and drains the negativity.