Lead Your Life

Awake, Aligned, and Grounded In Truth

Corpse Pose January 29, 2018

It’s the end of your yoga practice, and the teacher turns down the lights.  You know it’s coming…. savasana.  Deep rest.  No more sweating, twisting, or balancing.

Savasana translates to corpse pose.  Don’t let that make you feel any less affectionate about it!  The name reminds us that this pose is more than just resting.  It means to die to our little self (ego) so that our big Self (spirit) can soar.

In practical every day life, that might mean you invite your stories, fears, and limiting beliefs to pass away.  Your story of not enough time, your fear of failure, and your self chatter of “I’m not good enough.”

It might mean that we allow our roles and responsibilities to cease so that we know ourselves beyond our roles.  We connect with the essence of who we are, our divine state, first and foremost with a secondary interest in our responsibilities.  We value ourselves on our heart versus our achievements.  We love ourselves deeply as we are in our being versus our doing.

And it might mean that we simply let our thoughts die.  That at the end of our practice after we’ve worked out our bodies, minds, and energy, that we simply abide in stillness without effort.

For me, my body often appears to be in savasana but the rest of me is raring to go.  My mind is fired, my attention alert, my roles intact.  When this happens, can we let our judgement of self die?  Simply let what is be as it is.  Breathe it out.  Witness.  Accept.  Try anew.

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What does that word even mean? January 9, 2018

reverence

My favorite definition of reverence comes from Gary Zukav who defines it as this:

“Reverence is engaging in a form and a depth of contact with Life that is well beyond the shell of hte form and into the essence.  Reverence is contact with the essence of each thing, person, plan, bird, and animal.  It is contact with the interior of its beingness.  

Reverence is an attitude of honoring Life.  It is simply the experience of accepting that all Life is of value; in and of itself.”

I’m toying with this idea of seeing beyond sight to the interior of life:   To the interior of myself, to the interior of you, to the interior of relationships, to the interior of experience.  To dwell in connection with the essence versus form.  To experience by feeling versus thinking.

When we roll out our mat, we stand before a great opportunity to draw in the interior.  To move beyond habit and lean in towards the richness of reverence.

The rubber on the reverence road is engaging in the essence of what haunts or challenges us.  Maybe the “form” of that is a person or situation (and within both a belief we hold).  And if the only life we can course select is our own, then what does reverence look like in these sticky spots?

For me, I believe that our individual creation alone speaks to our divinity at the seat of our being.  Whether our life’s actions mirror that divinity is our choice; however, I live with the belief that within everyone, regardless of noise, abides divinity as essence.  And so, can I see it when the conversation is twisted?  Can I see it when I feel mistreated or underappreciated?  Can I dwell in the interior of a person versus poking at their exterior with my frustrated thoughts?

I roll out my mat for many reasons.  And this is one.  To learn to choose better in every moment so that more moments are spent in reverence.

 

Why do we roll? January 2, 2018

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starts here

Roll out our mat, that is.

What brings us to yoga is often not what draws us back.  We come wanting, striving, reaching for wellness, inner peace, and connection.  We come back to receive its gifts in a knowing that it is not about “doing yoga” but about allowing yoga to envelope us.  And instead of thinking we are “changed;” meaning we’ve altered our state, perhaps we can consider that we are awakened to our true and natural state.

Always there; waiting for us to notice.

A gift of our practice is harmony.  We practice over and over, and then one day sometime between our opening om and our closing savasana, we wake up to the simple wisdom that we are so much bigger than our mind.  That our intelligence bursts beyond the limits of our cognitive thinking.

Our mind – that beautiful cranium that resides in our upper quarter – was divinely designed as a tool.  And with any tool, we use appropriately and with purpose.  We use a hammer when a hammer is needed, a wrench when a wrench is needed, and we keep the whole tool kit tucked away when we have no need at all.  (And given that we have upwards of 70,000 thoughts a day; most of which are repetitive, unconscious, and not helpful, I might argue that we don’t need it as often as we assume).

Our mind enables us to use discernment, solve problems, map out, and progress forward.  Without it, we would struggle to exit bed let alone have a meaningful impact.  However, much like the hammer, it is not always the only and/or most meaningful source of intelligence to apply.

Within us we carry divine intelligence, innate wisdom, heart knowing, and body brilliance.  All guides and as powerful as our mind.

So we roll out our  mat, and we signal to the brain:  Relax. Trust. Play well with others.  I am grateful to you, and I am not enslaved to you.  And while our intelligence habit is one of mind dominance, we come to our mat to access our full knowing, our total Self.